Things I’ve Observed and Learned This Past Winter

Things I’ve Observed and Learned This Past Winter

  1. I am a big fan of ethanol. So it was interesting to learn that the POET plant in Emmetsburg, Iowa just started using corn stover & cobs as well as shelled corn. After the ethanol is extracted from the stover, what remains of the stover will be burnt to produce power to self-sustain the plant.  POET anticipates that all its plants will be run the same way before long.
  2. I read that in the next 20 years there needs to be as much food produced as has been produced in the entire history of man. (It’s almost hard to believe.)
  3. I enjoyed watching farmer, Chris Soules, from Arlington, Iowa on “The Bachelor” television program.  He was the perfect gentleman & according to his website he will use his celebrity status to promote agriculture in any way he possibly can.  He has already done some promotion for National Pork Producers.
  4. I learned that right now drones can’t legally be used for money making purposes and that it might be 2017 before approval is given. So I’m less excited about them than I was previously.
  5. I’ve seen and heard of many massive double wide (80’ x 240’) hog finishing buildings going up in NW Ohio. They hold 2,400 pigs. I feel that considering the problems with algae spoiling the water in Lake Erie and Grand Lake St. Marys this does not bode well for the people who draw their drinking water from the lakes. I know from experience that liquid manure can travel downward in the soil through cracks and worm holes or just from heavy rains. Combine that with the huge amount of plastic drainage tile that has been going in and you have a problem that has no solution. 

Daryl Bridenbaugh is a Team FIN farmer located in northwest Ohio.

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