International visitors are a common sight at the Farm Progress Show which draws people from more than 50 countries in most years There39s even an International Visitors area to help folks when they arrive

International visitors are a common sight at the Farm Progress Show, which draws people from more than 50 countries in most years. There's even an International Visitors area to help folks when they arrive.

Suiting up for the big show

While it may be possible to be "showed out" from all the talk about fall farm shows, and I'm sure by Thursday night I'll be happy to ease into the car to start my trip back home, it's still exciting to cover the big events. This week, I'm going to blog each day (not at the same time each day) sharing some of what I see at the show, revealing new ideas and key thoughts from people I'll be talking with during the show.

And while we often think about the unveilings of new machines at big events like the Farm Progress Show, there's also plenty of other tech to talk about. From new seed treatments to big data products, I'll try to share what I can from all the events and meetings I'm setting up. And you'll want to watch our Facebook page too because I plan to post images and other impressions this week. Or check out our Twitter feed if you like to watch us there. The key hashtag (for you social media mavens) is #farmprogressshow

I think the most interesting thing as I get ready to drive into Decatur today is the idea that we are excited about agriculture today, and this week. Yes, corn prices stink - and soybean prices aren't much better (and no, I don't like what I'm seeing in the wheat market either). Yes, equipment sales have fallen back to levels not seen since 2010. And yet the engineers, plant breeders, chemists and other innovators are still at work, whether you're talking about a new tillage tool from Kuhn Krause or hot new seed treatment tools from DuPont Pioneer.

This the underlying optimism of agriculture that shines through at certain times - one of which is a farm show. You can kind of 'get away' from the daily rat race of running your farm and relax in a festive atmosphere where you can learn more about the tools you use on your farm; and get a better idea of the tools you will be using in the future. And that excitement will continue, even though dampened for a short time by today's markets. In the long run, people still need to eat and the crops you raise are foundational to the production of meat, milk, fuel and fiber needed for the industry.

And when you're at a farm show - you pick your favorite - you're among friends. We're all here for the same reason, to have a little fun and get a little smarter. And some of us have to work a little harder than others - which means hitting 10,000 steps on the old step counter per day Tuesday through Thursday shouldn't be a problem.

Every spring you make the bet of a lifetime to grow a crop to feed your family (and the rest of us thank you) it's hard work, yet it can be rewarding too. Enjoy your trip to any show you pick and plan on seeing plenty of interesting stuff at any of the shows you attend. For me the focus this week is the Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Ill., and we'll be rockin' and rollin' that show starting early Tuesday morning. I'll be starting my visit this morning - the Monday before - getting prepped for the big show, and sharing a few images of other people at work.

And if you're at the show on Thursday, you can stop by the Hospitality Tent from Noon to 2 and we can chat about tech, and whatever else is on your mind. I look forward to it.

As for the headline? We suit up for Penton Agriculture events that means a Farm Progress Show shirt, and appropriate khaki pants (in my case shorts because Greg Soulje told me it was going to be hot). And I wear an Aussie-type wide-bring hat to keep the sun off too (along with sunscreen). So you might see me in my hat with my shorts and black backpack. If you do see me, say hi! We're all suiting up for the big show.

International visitors are a common sight at the Farm Progress Show, which draws people from more than 50 countries in most years. There's even an International Visitors area to help folks when they arrive.

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