It takes a lot of tireshine product to get that likenew look to farm tiresapparently We will not say where we found this

It takes a lot of tire-shine product to get that like-new look to farm tires...apparently. We will not say where we found this.

Last-minute touches, arrivals keep things moving

A stroll around a farm show facility the day before the open is part of the fun for media. We get a kind of behind the scenes look at what exhibits look like before they're finished and when they're up and running. Here at Husker Harvest Days, given that the last two weeks has been relatively dry, the pace has been measured, and relatively steady.

A common finishing touch for most big farm equipment is to shine the tires. This fellow got the short straw since the tires on a Claas Xerion are huge, but he was plugging away.

Oh, I'm sure that behind the scenes there has been a fair share of drama - the last-minute arrival in a rush for forklift service, or the exhibitor who's product didn't arrive, but on the whole final setup day is for finishing touches.

As the breezes blew on Monday I took a walk around the show site west of Grand Island for the 2015 Husker Harvest Days, and things looked nearly ready. In fact they were very far along, so there was little "setup imagery" to capture. That's a good thing for show organizers who want opening day to go off without a hitch.

Rest assured the food vendors are fully stocked, and companies are ready to dole out information and ideas for farmers looking to catch up on the latest tools and tech for their farms. And all the majors are here ready to show off everything and talk about those tools with interested visitors.

Well this should come as no surprise, I ran across this pile of tire-shine product cans. Now you know the secret ingredient if you're looking for that farm-show finish.

As loyal readers know, part of my job includes attending a few farm shows a year and I enjoy the many similarities and differences in each. Husker Harvest Days, as noted yesterday, holds a special position with its emphasis on irrigation equipment, but you'll also find a range of Nebraska-only companies on hand offering a range of tools and innovations.

One thing I'm noticing about the outdoor shows this year is a significant expansion in ride-and-drive experiences. If you're in the market for a new pickup truck or utility vehicle, this is an obligation free place to check out these tools.

Ford is even showing off a trailering system they say anyone can use to back a trailer without trouble. I'm thinking about giving that product a test because frankly I stink at backing up a trailer. Many times in the past when that task has been handed to me it has been the source of much amusement to my wife and daughter. Nothing like trying to watch a guy who seldom pulls a trailer try to back toward a target for loading. Well they thought it was funny.

On these pages you'll find a few things I ran across yesterday as I took my walk. Mostly about setup and one wing-nut thing I'll track down later and get the story on. It'll be obvious what that item is from the photo and caption on this page.

So this came in on a trailer, we're going to track this down and find out what the story is and tell you more in another blog installment. Interesting art.

We have a tradition here at Penton Agriculture for our shows of posting the morning sunrise from opening day. In the old days that's how we topped off our show site with a welcome to day one. Now we post it to the show's Facebook page since that's where a lot of you see information first.

Today is to be warm and windy, and frankly I'll take that over last year's soggy show with its own interesting weather challenges. We'll get dusty today, but that's agriculture, you farm no matter the weather, we put on a show under the same conditions.

This week I'll be spending plenty of time in the irrigation tech booths getting information for another project I'm involved in. If you see a guy in a Husker Harvest Shirt with a wide-brimmed hat, it's probably me. Say hi!

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish